2016 Summit2017-03-12T17:13:32+00:00
2016 National Summit on Youth Homelessness

When:

Tues, March 15, 2016 –
Wed, March 16, 2016

Where:

Holiday Inn Capitol
550 C Street SW
Washington, DC
20024

Conference Questions?

703.879.8348

NN4Y 2016 Summit Sponsorship Packet

Sponsorship Magazine
Summit Agenda
Hill Day Resource Guide

View and download the PowerPoint presentations and handouts from our 2016 Summit using the event app! On the homepage, resources are sorted by session.

NN4Y invites you to attend our third National Summit on Youth Homelessness in Washington, DC on March 15 – 16, 2016. This one-of-a-kind event focuses exclusively on how government agencies, policymakers, community leaders, services providers and other experts can partner together to end youth homelessness!

Our summit will highlight innovative and effective practices so that you can learn and replicate the same approaches within your own community. Moreover, you will learn about federal policies that are being implemented, considered or promoted by policymakers. NN4Y will also facilitate a discussion among federal agencies about their own work to address youth homelessness, including plans moving forward. This promises to be an interactive and dynamic two-day event!

Who should attend? You. As tireless advocates and allies for youth, you can use the summit to network with colleagues from across the country. What’s more, you’ll have the unique opportunity to meet one-on-one with lawmakers to advocate for effective federal policies and youth-appropriate resources. We hope to see you there!

Registration Level

Late Registration

  • $250
  • $300
  • $375
  • $135
  • $135
Online registration for this event is no longer available.
All program offerings for the 2016 National Summit on Youth Homelessness, except the Hill Day meetings, will be held at the Holiday Inn Capitol on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. We strongly encourage all attendees to book their accommodations at the Holiday Inn prior to February 15, 2016.
**The hotel is sold out on 3/15 and 3/16

Reservation Information

Single and Double Occupancy $239
Group Rate Cut-off Date: February 15, 2016

About the Hotel

Holiday Inn CapitolThe Holiday Inn® Washington – Capitol Hotel has a superior location that places you one block from the Smithsonian’s National Air & Space Museum, five blocks from the US Capitol and just a few blocks from the National Mall which includes famous monuments like the Washington Monument. NN4Y meeting attendees will receive complimentary in-room internet access.
Check-in time is after 4:00 pm and check-out time is prior to 12:00 noon. The hotel will make every effort to accommodate requests for early check-in or late checkout, however we cannot guarantee being able to do so.
Overnight Parking $30.00 per night, plus 12% tax
In-Room Internet Complimentary

Directions

Follow I-395 North to US Route 1 North (left 2 lanes on the bridge over Potomac). Follow US-1 North to the second traffic light after the bridge. Turn right onto Independence Avenue SW to 6th Street SW. Turn right onto 6th Street SW to C Street SW, turn left onto C Street SW. The hotel is on the corner of 6th & C Street, SW. The hotel’s main entrance is on C Street SW.
Take I-66 East toward Washington, DC. Cross the Theodore Roosevelt Bridge. I-66 East will turn into Constitution Avenue NW. Take Constitution Avenue NW to 7th Street NW. Turn right onto 7th Street NW to Independence Avenue SW. Turn left onto Independence Avenue SW to 6th Street SW. Turn right onto 6th Street SW to C Street SW, turn left onto C Street SW. The hotel is on the corner of 6th & C Street SW. The hotel’s main entrance is on C Street SW.
Exit airport on I-195 W. Merge onto MD-295 S. via exit 2B toward Washington. Continue onto Baltimore-Washington Pkwy (295-S). Take exit 1B-C toward I-695/Route 395/Downtown. Keep right to continue toward I-695. Continue onto I-695 (signs for I-395/Downtown). Use the right lane to merge onto I-395 S. Take exit 5 for 6th Street Southwest. Continue on 6th Street SW to the 3rd light, just past an overhead bridge. The hotel is on the corner of 6th & C Street SW. The hotel’s main entrance is on C Street SW.
Take I-95 South through the Baltimore area. Continue until you see signs for the Baltimore-Washington Parkway. Take the Baltimore-Washington Parkway to “Washington Route 50 West” exit. Continue on Route 50 (New York Avenue) until you come to I-395 South (about 4 miles). Turn left onto I-395 South, go about 1.5 miles to 6th Street SW exit. Make a hard right turn onto 6th Street SW. Continue on 6th Street SW to the 3rd light, just past an overhead bridge. The hotel is on the corner of 6th & C Street SW. The hotel’s main entrance is on C Street SW.
Take I-95 North to I-395 North Washington, DC. Follow I-395 North to US Route 1 North (left 2 lanes on the bridge over Potomac). Follow US-1 North to the second traffic light after the bridge. Turn right onto Independence Avenue SW to 6th Street SW. Turn right onto 6th Street SW to C Street SW, turn left onto C Street SW. The hotel is on the corner of 6th & C Street, SW. The hotel’s main entrance is on C Street SW.
Take I-66 East toward Washington, DC. Cross the Theodore Roosevelt Bridge. I-66 East will turn into Constitution Avenue NW. Take Constitution Avenue NW to 7th Street NW. Turn right onto 7th Street NW to Independence Avenue SW. Turn left onto Independence Avenue SW to 6th Street SW. Turn right onto 6th Street SW to C Street SW, turn left onto C Street SW. The hotel is on the corner of 6th & C Street SW. The hotel’s main entrance is on C Street SW.
Follow signs to the Capitol Beltway South (I-495), take I-495 South toward Virginia. Follow I-495 South toward Virginia for approx 4 miles. Exit onto the George Washington Memorial Pkwy, and continue on the Parkway to I-395 North. I-395 North will put you on the 14th Street bridge. Move immediately to one of the two left lanes on the bridge (US Route 1 North). Follow US-1 North to the second traffic light after the bridge. Turn right onto Independence Avenue SW to 6th Street SW. Turn right onto 6th Street SW to C Street SW, turn left onto C Street SW. The hotel is on the corner of 6th & C Street SW. Hotel’s main entrance is on C Street SW.
Take Route 50 East (New York Avenue) to I-395 South. Turn left on to I-395 South, go about 1.5 miles to 6th Street SW exit. Make a hard right turn onto 6th Street SW. Continue on 6th Street SW to the 3rd light, just past an overhead bridge. The hotel is on the corner of 6th and C Street SW. The Hotel’s main entrance is on C Street SW
Download The Sponsorship Magazine

Level One — Gold Event Sponsor — $15,000

One (1) Available
This sponsor will receive:
  • An opportunity to deliver a brief welcome address at a scheduled event on the program or 10 minute presentation at the networking reception
  • Twitter promotion of one of your organization’s hashtags during Summit promotions cycle
  • Logo placement on electronic marketing communication and promotional materials (includes website, emails, etc.)
  • Three (3) complimentary registrations
  • A full page ad of the Summit program
  • Two (2) promotional items in the registration packet
  • One (1) exhibit table
  • Digital copy of the attendee registration list (pre-registration and post-event)

Level Two — Silver Event Sponsor — $10,000

Two (2) Available Only One (1) Left!
This sponsor will receive:
  • Two (2) complimentary registrations
  • A full page ad in the Summit program
  • Logo placement on electronic marketing communication and promotional materials (includes website, emails, etc.)
  • One (1) promotional item in the registration packet
  • One (1) exhibit table
  • Digital copy of the attendee registration list (pre-registration and post-event)

Level Three — Bronze Event Sponsor — $5,000

Two (2) Available Only One (1) Left!
This sponsor will receive:
  • One (1) complimentary registrations and one discounted registration
  • A full page ad in the Summit program
  • Logo placement on electronic marketing communication and promotional materials
  • One (1) promotional item in the registration packet
  • One (1) exhibit table
  • Digital copy of the attendee registration list (pre-registration and post-event)

Level Four — Lunch Sponsor — $3,000

Two (2) Available SOLD OUT
The lunch sponsors will receive:
  • One (1) complimentary registration
  • A half page ad in the Summit program
  • One (1) promotional item in the registration packet
  • Digital copy of the attendee registration list (pre-registration and post-event)

Level Five — Mobile App Sponsor — $2,800

One (1) Available
The mobile app sponsor will receive:
  • One (1) complimentary registration
  • A half page ad in the Summit program
  • Co-branding of the mobile app home screen
  • A digital banner ad in the mobile app
  • Digital copy of the attendee registration list (pre-registration and post-event)

Level Six — Breakfast Sponsor — $2,000

Two (2) Available SOLD OUT
Reception sponsors will receive:
  • One (1) complimentary registration
  • A half page ad in the Summit program
  • One (1) promotional item in the registration packet
  • Digital copy of the attendee registration list (pre-registration and post-event)

Level Seven — Reception Sponsor — $1,650

Two (2) Available SOLD OUT
Reception sponsors will receive:
  • Special thank you acknowledgment at the event
  • One (1) complimentary registration
  • Digital copy of the attendee registration list (pre-registration and post-event)

Level Eight — Registration Sponsor — $1,500

One (1) Available SOLD OUT
Registration sponsor will receive:
  • Logo on registration signage
  • One (1) discounted registration
  • A half page ad in the Summit program
  • Digital copy of the attendee registration list (pre-registration and post-event)

Level Nine — Audio/Visual Sponsor — $1,400

Two (2) Available SOLD OUT
Audio/Visual sponsors will receive:
  • A full page ad in the Summit program
  • A digital ad at the beginning of each session
  • Digital copy of the attendee registration list (pre-registration and post-event)

Level Ten — Print Program Sponsor — $1,500

One (1) Available SOLD OUT
Print program sponsor will receive:
  • A full page ad in the Summit program (front inside cover)
  • One (1) promotional item in the registration packet
  • Digital copy of the attendee registration list (pre-registration and post-event)

Level Eleven — Session Sponsor — $750

Five (5) Available One (1) Available
Session sponsors will receive:
  • Sponsorship of one of five program offerings:  Opening session, Federal Agency Roundtable and three other sessions to be identified at a later date
  • Logo next to session in the Summit program

Level Twelve — Exhibit Table — $275

Eight (8) Available SOLD OUT
Exhibit table sponsors will receive:
  • One (1) 6-ft exhibit table, either in the perimeter of the main meeting room or in the main meeting room foyer
  • 25% off one (1) conference registration
  • Digital copy of the attendee registration list (pre-registration and post-event)

Opportunities Await!

Now that you’ve reviewed the sponsorship opportunities, if one seems right for you, please contact us to secure your sponsorship. Remember, sponsorships are awarded on a first come, first awarded basis, so if you want to sponsor a particular level, secure it as soon as you can.
Summit Agenda PDF

Tuesday, March 15, 2016

7:30 – 9:15 am Registration
Check-in of all Summit attendees.
7:30 – 8:45 am NN4Y Members-Only Annual Meeting and Breakfast
During our forty-second annual membership meeting, you will learn about our ongoing work and plans for the future. Attendees will have the opportunity to ask questions, offer suggestions and discuss their own efforts throughout the country. Registration is limited to NN4Y members only.
9:00 – 9:30 am Summit Begins: Welcome

Listen to a clip of Executive Director, Darla Bardine’s welcome!

9:30 – 10:30 am General Session: Federal Policy Updates
Youth homelessness has evolved into a hot topic among policymakers, and we’re eager to discuss their work! Attendees will receive the latest updates and information from Capitol Hill.
10:30 – 10:45 am Break
10:45 am– 12:00 pm Two Breakouts: First Round
Breakout 1
What More Can We Do? Characterizing RHY Program Effectiveness
Is there a better way to serve youth in your community? After several years of research, Dr. Marya Gwadz and James “Bo” Bolas are prepared to answer that question. Join our speakers as they review the settings, strategies and other characteristics associated with successful programs. Their findings integrate qualitative and quantitative data sources, and capture the voices of program administrators, staff and youth themselves.
Breakout 2
Truth in Numbers: How to Improve Community RHY Counts
For decades, we have not had an accurate estimate of the scope of youth homelessness in America. Local efforts have been confounded by limited resources and inconsistent policies and practices. What can you and your community do to achieve more accurate estimates? Experts from CA, CT and TX will take part in an interactive moderated discussion. They will answer questions concerning the methodologies, key partners and reporting tactics most likely to yield successful community counts.
Panelists include: Dr. Coco Auerswald, Associate Professor, Community Health and Human Development and Director, MS Program, UC Berkeley-UCSF Joint Medical ProgramChristine Gendron, Executive Director, MPAFF, Texas Network of Youth Services (TNOYS)Stacey Violante Cote, Esq., MSW, Director, Teen Legal Advocacy Project, Center for Children’s Advocacy
12:00 – 1:00 pm Lunch
12:30 – 1:00 pm Keynote Speaker:U.S. Senator Susan Collins
1:00 – 1:15 pm Break
1:15 – 2:30 pm Two Breakouts: Second Round
Breakout 1
Healing the Homeless: Streetwise Standards of Youth Engagement
Decades of research prove that traumatic experiences alter the course of healthy youth development. Nevertheless, many professionals struggle to address the physical, emotional and social effects of homelessness. For this reason, Juli Hishida will discuss promising practices for administering quality healthcare to youth experiencing homelessness. Her presentation will review trauma-informed care, cultural humility and other principles of holistic youth engagement.
Breakout 2
When Crises Collide: Serving Trafficked Youth on the Streets
Upon becoming homeless, youth are routinely targeted, exploited and traumatized by criminal networks. Often, service providers and other programs are in contact with these exploited and trafficked young people, but may not have the training to identify the vast majority of these survivors. Stephanie Richard and Nat Paul will provide information about human trafficking and discuss how you can prevent and disrupt the exploitation of runaway and homeless youth. Moreover, attendees will learn strategies to help victims recover and ultimately transition back to society.
2:30 – 2:45 pm Break
2:45 – 4:00 pm Two Breakouts: Third Round
Breakout 1
The “Hows” of Housing: Navigating RRH, SH and TH for Youth
Housing embodies one of the most obvious and immediate solutions to homelessness. However, systematic barriers and technicalities stand between young people and the shelter they need. Sparky Harlan and Rich Hooks Wayman will explain when, why and how to pursue different housing options for youth. Specifically, they will help attendees navigate issues of eligibility, funding and affordability.
Breakout 2
Inside the WISE MIND: Dialectical Behavior Therapy for RHY
Youth are creative and capable individuals who strive to learn more about themselves and the world. According to Krysta Esquivel and Kristina Halmai, professionals in our field can do more to support and harness these natural qualities. Their presentation will focus on the adaptation of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) and Mindfulness to youth engagement. Upon mastering these techniques, attendees can help youth maintain healthy relationships and prepare for adulthood.
4:00 – 5:00 pm General Session:
HMIS/RHYMIS

Is the HMIS/RHYMIS integration impacting youth and professionals in your community? Moreover, how are federal agencies using this information? What questions do you have? HHS and HUD staff will provide clear and direct answers to these questions, among others so that data and information integration can be used effectively to inform community planning and service delivery.
6:00 – 8:30 pm Networking Reception
After a long and fulfilling day, we invite you to relax and enjoy complimentary refreshments! Attendees will have the unique opportunity to connect with colleagues and other professionals from across the country.

Wednesday, March 16, 2016

7:30 – 9:15 am Registration
8:00 – 9:00 am Breakfast
9:00 am – 12:00 pm Hill Meetings
9:15 – 10:15 am Special Programming:
What Works and Why? Reviewing Coordinated Entry for Youth

Our very own Amy Louttit will summarize requirements for coordinated entry and review issues of concern for youth. Then, you will learn about what Washington, DC is doing to implement coordinated entry from local experts. This session will conclude with an open discussion about best practices at the community level.
Presenters include: Deborah Shore, Board Chair, NN4Y and Executive Director and Founder, Sasha Bruce Youthwork
Kristy Greenwalt, Executive Director, DC’s Interagency Council on Homelessness
10:30 – 11:30 am Special Programming:
Getting to Graduation: New Educational Protections from High School Through College

Last year, President Obama approved the “Every Student Succeeds Act,” which strengthens educational services and protections and for homeless youth. Additionally, the U.S. Department of Education issued new guidance on financial aid to help RHY access new opportunities in the classroom. Finally, the Administration for Children and Families proposed regulations to connect homeless youth and their families to Head Start and child care. After reviewing these new rights and resources, Barbara Duffield will discuss other advocacy opportunities.
11:30 am – 12:30 pm Lunch
12:15 – 12:45 pm Keynote Speaker: Rafael López, Commissioner, Administration on Children, Youth and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
12:45 – 1:00 pm Break
1:00 – 3:00 pm Federal Agency Roundtable Discussion
How do government agencies collaborate to address a national epidemic? We invite you to join federal staff as they discuss new and ongoing initiatives to end youth homelessness. Each year, this facilitated discussion yields at least one commitment from every participating agency. Also, Summit attendees will have the opportunity to ask questions directly to the participating federal staff. Once again, we expect our roundtable to identify intersections between policy, practice and youth homelessness prevention. Participants include:
  • Jennifer Cannistra , Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)
  • Kelly Fitzpatrick, Policy Advisor in the Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Policy Development, U.S. Department of Education (ED)
  • Robert Listenbee, Administrator of the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP), U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ)
  • Ann Marie Oliva, Deputy Assistant Secretary for the Office of Special Needs Assistance Programs (SNAPS), U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD)
  • Jennifer Troke, Division Chief of the Division of Youth Services, U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL)
  • Jasmine Hayes, Policy Director on Youth and Families with the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness (USICH).
3:00 – 3:15 pm Closing
Please note that the agenda is subject to change.

Dr. Colette (Coco) Auerswald is Director of the JMP Master’s Program and research curriculum, an inter-disciplinary effort dedicated to individual and public health. She also holds academic positions at the Berkeley and San Francisco campuses of the University of California. Throughout her career, Dr. Auerswald has researched the relationship between poverty and health among youth. She is regarded as a leading expert on topics of social epidemiology, medical anthropology and adolescent health.

Darla BardineDarla Bardine is a public interest attorney serving as Executive Director of the National Network for Youth. She has dedicated her career to young people and families who experience homelessness, poverty, violence and exploitation.

Before joining NN4Y, Darla created and launched the Fight Child Exploitation in Tourism Initiative in South Africa and worked to reform foster care in Washington, DC. As a federal policy advocate, she fought to secure assistance for families navigating the complex criminal justice and child welfare systems. During this time, Darla established her reputation as an exceptional leader, policy advocate and grassroots organizer.

In 2013, Dara helped re-launch and re-structure NN4Y. As Policy Director, she established an unprecedented coalition of homeless youth providers, advocates, experts and young leaders from across the country. She also launched NN4Y’s 2013-2015 RHYA Reauthorization Working Group, the National Youth Advisory Council and the National Summit on Youth Homelessness. Since becoming Executive Director in 2014, Darla has continued to expand the width and depth of NN4Y’s advocacy agenda. Moreover, she has strengthened the capacity of individuals and organizations to advocate on behalf of young people experiencing homelessness.

Ms. Bardine holds a B.S. in Criminal Justice from Pennsylvania State University, an M.A. in Nonprofit Management from the University of Roehampton and a J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center.

James James “Bo” Bolas is Executive Director of the Coalition for Homeless Youth and Co-Principal Investigator for the Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Impact Study. As an advocate, trainer and service provider, he has supported the youth homelessness movement for 27 years. After co-founding New York’s first homeless youth peer outreach program, Bo helped secured permanent housing for families in California. He has also consulted for a number of foreign programs, including Doctors of the World and London’s Streetwork Project.

Senator Susan CollinsFirst elected in 1996, Maine’s Senator Susan Collins is serving her fourth term in the United States Senate. Recognized as a skillful legislator and as a facilitator of bipartisan compromise, Senator Collins is a key leader in the U.S. Congress. In 2015, Senator Collins was ranked the most bipartisan member of the U.S. Senate by the Lugar Center and Georgetown University.

Addressing youth homelessness is among Senator Collins’ top priorities as the Chairman of the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Transportation, Housing, and Urban Development. Last year, Senator Collins chaired a hearing to examine the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s efforts to prevent and end youth homelessness. Senator Collins is the lead cosponsor of the Runaway and Homeless Youth and Trafficking Prevention Act, which would reauthorize programs that help homeless youth obtain emergency shelter, crisis intervention services, long-term housing, education, and job training. She is also one of the lead sponsors of the Family Unification Modernization and Improvement Act, which would help ensure that families and foster youth who are experiencing or are at risk of homelessness have access to the housing and supportive services they need.

Known for her Maine work ethic, Senator Collins has never missed a vote in her nineteen years in office—more than 6,000 consecutive votes.

Jennifer CannistraJennifer Cannistra is the Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary in ASPE. She previously served as the Department’s Executive Secretary, where she helped manage the Department’s regulatory and policy decision-making processes. Earlier in the Administration, Jen served as Senior Advisor for Legal Affairs in the HHS Office of Health Reform, where she helped implement the Affordable Care Act, and as Policy Analyst and Director of Special Projects in the White House Office of Health Reform, where she worked closely with officials from across the Administration to develop and pass health reform. Before joining the Administration, Jen held several positions on the 2008 Obama for America campaign, served as a law clerk to a federal judge, and worked as an associate at a DC law firm. Jen received a B.A. from Princeton University, a Masters degree from Oxford University, and a J.D. from Harvard Law School.

Stacey Violante Cote is Director of the Teen Legal Advocacy Project at the Center for Children’s Advocacy. Before joining the Center, she received a Skadden Fellowship to pilot school-based legal services in Connecticut. These efforts earned statewide recognition, and successfully elevated the needs of abused, neglected, homeless and special education students. Today, Stacey and her team ensure that educational opportunities, government benefits and legal support are available to all youth in Connecticut.

Barbara DuffieldBarbara Duffield is Director of Policy and Programs for the National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth. Before joining NAEHCY, she served as a tutor for homeless children and as Director of Education with the National Coalition for the Homeless. For two-and-a-half decades, Ms. Duffield has worked closely with schools, service providers, federal agencies and Congressional offices to strengthen policy and practice on children’s issues. Additionally, she has conducted hundreds of trainings across the country to promote the unique needs of RHY.

Krysta EsquivelKrysta Esquivel is creator of the Connections Project and a 15-year veteran of the youth service industry. She is dedicated to improving the lives of young people and sharing knowledge within her field. Ms. Esquivel holds a bachelor’s degree in psychology and a master’s degree in social work.

Kelly Fitzpatrick serves as Policy Advisor with the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Planning, Evaluation and Policy Development. Kelly began her career in the classroom, where she developed effective, innovative and inspiring standards of instruction. Today, departmental leaders rely on her passion and expertise to support an extensive policy agenda. Working alongside the White House and other federal agencies, Kelly targets special K-12 populations, immigrant students, English learners and migrant children.

Christine GendronChristine Gendron is Executive Director of the Texas Network of Youth Services. She previously researched, evaluated and administered a variety of youth-centric initiatives at the University of Texas at Austin. Under Christine’s leadership, TNOYS has effectively protected and strengthened services for youth and their families in Texas. As Executive Director, she supervises training and consultation services at the community level. Christine also coordinates lobbying efforts to secure policy solutions for youth homelessness.

Marya GwadzDr. Marya Gwadz is a licensed clinical psychologist and Senior Research Scientist at the New York University College of Nursing. She also serves as Director of the Transdisciplinary Research Methods Core at the Center for Drug Use and HIV Research. For nearly three decades, Dr. Gwadz has worked closely with homeless and runaway youth, people of low socioeconomic status and other populations at high risk for HIV/AIDS. Her research targets the racial and ethnic disparities of infection using potent, innovative and culturally appropriate interventions.

Kristina HalmaiKristina Halmai supervises the clinical component of the Connections Project. In this capacity, she works closely with Connections Coaches and support staff to adapt DBT informed intervention and maintain fidelity across sites. Prior to working with the Connections project, Kristina spent several years with an emergency shelter for teens and families in crisis as well as a transitional living program for former foster females. She has extensive knowledge and experience using evidence-based models and creating curriculum for culturally competent, high quality service delivery.

Sparky HarlanSparky Harlan is Chief Executive Officer of the Bill Wilson Center. Since assuming leadership in 1983, Ms. Harlan has secured housing, education and employment for countless youth and families in Santa Clara, California. She is also largely responsible for developing a national continuum of care for runaway and homeless youth, foster youth and youth involved with the juvenile justice system. As a result of these efforts, Ms. Harlan has received prestigious awards from the National Network for Youth, National Safe Place and the White House. She holds master’s degree in nonprofit administration from the University of San Francisco.

Jasime HayesJasmine Hayes is the Policy Director of Youth and Families with the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness. Jasmine has worked with local and state leaders to drive child welfare practice for over 15 years. At the state-level, she led the Planning, Policy, and Quality Improvement divisions along with the Resource Development Office for the District of Columbia’s child welfare agency. In addition to spearheading the development of transitional housing resources for child welfare-involved mothers, Jasmine helped shape and launch the District’s Title IV-E waiver demonstration project. Jasmine has a Master of Social Work degree from the University of Toronto.

Juli HishidaJuli Hishida is Project Manager at the National Health Care for the Homeless Council. Before assuming her current position, she was part of the Council’s Engaging Homeless Youth workgroup, Clinician’s Network and Youth Engagement project. For the past six years, Juli has focused on supporting federal health center programs that receive HCH funding. Specifically, she helps grantees comply with federal program requirements and mitigate other technical issues. Outside the Council, Juli provides counseling services to low-income and unstably housed individuals.

Robert ListenbeeRobert Listenbee is the Administrator of the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention with the United States Department of Justice. He was appointed by President Barack Obama in February 2013 and was sworn in to the position on March 25, 2013. As Administrator, Mr. Listenbee is working to realize the agency’s vision of a nation where all children are healthy, educated and free from violence. To fulfill this vision, he leads efforts to fulfil the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act, reduce out-of-home placement and promote developmental, trauma-informed approaches to juvenile justice.

Rafael López, is the Commissioner of the Administration on Children, Youth and Families (ACYF) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

López is a results driven leader with experience in helping lead complex organizations in the public and social sectors where he has served in numerous roles at the city, county and state level focused on improving the lives of children, families and communities. From 2013-2015, López served as a Senior Policy Advisor at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy within the Executive Office of the President and with the Domestic Policy Council.

Prior to his service at the White House, López was an Associate Director at the Annie E. Casey Foundation, a private, national philanthropy devoted to developing a brighter future for millions of children at risk of poor educational, economic, social and health outcomes. Previously, López served as the President and CEO of The Family League of Baltimore City, Inc. where he was a member of the Baltimore City Mayor’s Cabinet. From 2006-2009, López was appointed by Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa to serve on his Cabinet as the Executive Director of the City of Los Angeles Commission for Children, Youth and Their Families. López previously served as the Deputy Director of the City and County of San Francisco Department of Children, Youth, and Their Families and as Senior Deputy for Health and Human Services for Los Angeles County Supervisor Gloria Molina. From 1999-2004, López served as the Founding Executive Director of First 5 Santa Cruz County where he launched the countywide implementation of the California Children and Families First Act-Proposition 10 and led innovative efforts to expand and create programs and services in health, school readiness, and family support including the creation of one of California’s first comprehensive health coverage programs for all Santa Cruz County children.

In 1999, López became the youngest person in the City’s history to serve on the Watsonville City Council where he led neighborhood based efforts to civically engage youth and immigrant families in the development of city services. He has worked closely with community based organizations as a volunteer, manager, executive, board member and founder and was sponsored by the David and Lucile Packard Foundation to serve as a fellow at Stanford University’s Center for Social Innovation at the Graduate School of Business Executive Program for Nonprofit Leaders. López was awarded a 2007-2008 Annie E. Casey Foundation Children and Family National Fellowship.

Born and raised in Watsonville, California, López is an alumnus of Vassar College and the University of California Santa Cruz where he graduated with honors in American Studies. He is a graduate of Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government where he earned a Master in Public Administration and was named a Lucius N. Littauer Fellow. López and his wife, Rosa Ramírez-López, live in Washington, D.C. with their sons Adán Miguel and Mateo Gabriel.

Amy LouttitAmy Louttit joined StraightUp AmeriCorps in California, where she worked as an academic mentor and advocate for homeless and unaccompanied youth. After two terms, she became a residential counselor in a group home for adolescents. Upon discovering the complex legal barriers faced by the youth she served, Amy decided to attend Thomas Jefferson School of Law. As a student, she received numerous awards and scholarships – including a prestigious certificate in Law and Social Justice. Amy also became a Youth Director on the San Diego Unaccompanied Youth Task Force, a collaborative initiative between the National Association for the Education of Children and Youth (NAEHCY) and the San Diego Continuum of Care. While serving the Task Force, Amy partnered with state legislative staff to help guide and build new legislation. As a result, she was recognized for outstanding legislative testimony.

Since joining NN4Y, Amy has assumed responsibility for soliciting and submitting comments on policies related to youth homelessness. Her efforts have earned widespread support from national, state and local organizations within the National Network and beyond. Amy continues to inspire dialogue about the challenges and solutions that affect youth service providers in America. Her topics of expertise include access to healthcare, housing, employment and education; RHYMIS/HMIS integration; Continuums of Care and Notices of Funding Availability; Rapid Re-Housing—and many more.

Ann Marie OlivaAnn Marie Oliva is the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Special Needs, which oversees the Office of HIV/AIDS Housing and the Office of Special Needs Assistance Programs. In this capacity, Ms. Oliva helps administer a variety of homelessness prevention efforts on behalf of United States Department of Housing and Urban Development. As Director of SNAPS, she has managed a portfolio of over 8,000 competitive and formula grants with an annual budget of over $2 billion. Prior to joining HUD, Ms. Oliva served as an independent human services consultant and technical assistance provider.

Nat PaulNat Paul is an advocate for homeless and trafficked members of the LGBTQ community. She is currently developing PRISM, a long-term aftercare program designed to reintroduce victims to society. At the local, state and national level, Nat initiates important dialogues about the LGBTQ experience.

Stephanie RichardStephanie Kay Richard is the Policy and Legal Services Director at the Coalition to Abolish Slavery and Trafficking. Before joining CAST, she served as the domestic lead for the Alliance to End Slavery & Trafficking and the policy Co-Chair of the Freedom Network, USA. Since receiving her law degree, Ms. Richard has been part of anti-trafficking movement for over a decade. In addition to technical consultation, she provides direct legal services to survivors across the country.

Deborah ShoreDebby Shore is the Founder and Executive Director of Sasha Bruce Youthwork. For over 30 years, her work as a service provider, advocate and thought leader has transformed young lives in Washington, DC. Ms. Shore’s influential approach to youth empowerment utilizes a cost-effective and competency-based approach to counseling and supportive services. In the course of training excellent staff, Debby has helped SBY embrace understand and embrace the needs of troubled youth and families.

Brooke Spellman is Principal Associate with Abt Associates—a public policy and consulting firm dedicated to economic prosperity. For over two decades, she has researched complex issues of homelessness, poverty and community development. As a national thought leader, Ms. Spellman relies on data systems and analysis to understand the causes, patterns and outcomes of homelessness. In turn, her findings facilitate system- and program-level service delivery, technical assistance and training, grants management and other strategic interventions.

Jennifer TrokeDr. Jennifer Troke is a Division Chief at the U.S. Department of Labor (USDOL) Employment & Training Administration’s Office of Workforce Investment (OWI), Division of Youth Services where she focuses primarily on managing several youth development programs including the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) youth formula system, the YouthBuild program, and a series of grants that support court-involved youth and adults. She has also managed the Department’s H-1B Technical Skills Training grants and the Jobs and Innovation Accelerator grants that focus on providing skills training in high growth industries including manufacturing, healthcare, and energy. Jen and her team develop and implement technical assistance strategies, policy guidance, performance outcomes, and other strategic priorities for the Department that ultimately result in getting people into jobs through education and training. Prior to that, she worked with the Business Relations Group to help large national employers, like CVS, Home Depot, and Bank of America, navigate the workforce investment system. She is a native Texan with an undergraduate degree from Texas Tech, a Masters in Public Administration from Appalachian State University, and an Ed.D. in Educational Leadership from the University of North Carolina Greensboro in 1998. Jen lives in Silver Spring with her delightful husband, two entertaining kids, two lovable dogs, and one shy cat.

Rich Hooks WaymanRich Hooks Wayman serves as they CEO of LUK, Inc., a nonprofit organization dedicated to crisis care, social services and behavior health. Before leading his own organization, Rich worked for the Legal Aid society of Minneapolis, the Street Workers Collaborative and the National Alliance to End Homelessness. He has served homeless youth numerous capacities, including free legal services, street outreach and policy analysis. As Executive Director of Heart Connection, he also pursued supportive housing for chronically homeless persons in Minnesota.

Silver Event Sponsor

The Alliance To End Slavery & Trafficking (ATEST)

Bronze Event Sponsor

Covenant House

Lunch Sponsor

Sasha Bruce Youthwork

True Colors Fund

Breakfast Sponsor

The Night Ministry

YouthCare

Reception Sponsors

Larkin Street Youth Services

YMCA

Registration Sponsor

Gelman, Rosenberg & Freedman CPAs

Audio/Visual Sponsor

Schultz Family Foundation

National Safe Place Network

Print Sponsor

National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth

Session Sponsor

Youth Services

COA

National Alliance to End Homelessness

Cort Furniture